Jamb 2020/2021 syllabus in Literature in English

Share:
Jamb 2020/2021 syllabus in Literature in English


The aim of the Unified Tertiary Matriculation Examination (UTME) syllabus in Literature in English is to prepare the candidates for the Board’s examination.  It is designed to test their achievement of the course objectives, which are to:

1. Stimulate and sustain their interest in Literature in English;
2. Create an awareness of the general principles and functions of language;
3. Appreciate literary works of all genres and across all cultures;
4. Apply the knowledge of Literature in English to the analysis of social, political and economic events in the society.



1.


  DRAMA
a. Types:
i. Tragedy ii. Comedy
iii. Tragicomedy iv. Melodrama v. Farce   

b. Dramatic Techniques

i. Characterisation ii. Dialogue
iii. Flashback iv. Mime 
v. Costume vi. Music/Dance vii. D├ęcor viii. Acts/Scenes ix. Soliloquy/aside etc.
c. Interpretation of the Prescribed Texts
i. Theme
ii. Plot
iii. Socio-political context
Candidates should be able to:
i. identify the various types of drama;
ii. analyse the contents of the various types of drama;
iii. compare and contrast the features of
different dramatic types;

 iv. demonstrate adequate knowledge of
dramatic techniques used in each prescribed text;
 
v. differentiate between styles of selected playwrights;
vi. determine the theme of any prescribed
text;
vii. identify the plot of the play;


viii. apply the lessons of the play to everyday living.
 
 


2.


3. PROSE
a. Types:
i. Fiction
Novel
Novella
Short story

ii. Non-fiction
Biography
Autobiography
Memoir

b. Narrative Techniques/Devices:
i. Point of view
Omniscent/Third Person
First Person

ii. Setting
Temporal 
Spatial/Geographical
iii. Characterisation
Round characters
Flat characters

iv. Language use
c. Textual Analysise
i. Theme
ii. Plot
iii. Socio-political context

  POETRY
a. Types:
i. Sonnet
ii. Ode
iii. Lyrics iv. Elegy
v. Ballad vi. Panegyric vii. Epic
viii. Blank Verse

b. Poetic Devices
i. Structure  ii. Imagery iii. Rhyme/Rhythm
Candidates should be able to:
i. differentiate between types of prose;
ii. identify the category that each prescribed text belongs to;
iii. analyse the components of each type of
prose;






iv. identify the narrative techniques used in each of the prescribed texts;
v. determine an author’s narrative style;







vi. distinguish between one type of
character from another;



vii. determine the thematic pre-occupation of the author of the prescribed text;
viii. indicate the plot of the novel; ix. relate the prescribed text to real life situations.

Candidates should be able to:
i. identify different types of poetry; ii. compare and contrast the features of different poetic types:







iii. determine the devices used by various poets; iv. show how poetic devices are used for aesthetic effect in each poem;


 


  iv. Diction
v. Persona
c. Appreciation








4.
5.

  i. Thematic preoccupation
ii. Socio-political relevance

GENERAL LITERARY PRINCIPLES
a. Literary terms:
foreshadowing, suspense, theatre, monoloque, dialoque, soliloquy, symbolism, protagonist, antagonist, figures of speech, satire, stream of consciousness etc,  in addition to those listed above under the different genres. 

b. Relationship between literary terms and principles.

LITERARY
APPRECIATION

Unseen passage/extracts from Drama, Prose and Poetry. v. deduce the poet’s preoccupation from the poem; vi. appraise poetry as an art with moral values;
vii. apply the lessons from the poem to real life situations.


Candidates should be able to:
i. identify literary terms in drama, prose and poetry;
ii. differentiate between literary terms and
principles;

iii. use literary terms appropriately.






Candidates should be able to:

i. determine literary devices used in a given passage/extract;
ii. provide a meaningful inter-pretation of the given passage/extract; iii. relate the extract to true life
experiences.




 
 
A LIST OF SELECTED AFRICAN AND NON-AFRICAN PLAYS, NOVELS AND POEMS




Drama:
African:
1. Femi Osofisan: Women of Owu

Non African:
1. William Shakespeare: The Tempest

Prose:
African:
i. Asare Konadu: A woman in Her Prime
ii. Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: Purple Hibiscus

Non African:
i. Ernest Hemingway: The Old Man and The Sea

Poetry: African:
i. Gbemisola Adeoti; Hard lines ii. P.O.C. Umeh: Ambassadors of Poverty iii. Shola Owonibi: Homeless not Hopeless iv. Syl Cheney-Coker: Myopia v. Jared Angira: Expelled vi. Traditional: Serenade.

Non African:
i. John Donne: The Sun Rising ii. Sir Walter Raleigh: The Soul’s Errand iii. Langston Hughes: Negro Speaks of Rivers iv. John Fletcher: Upon an Honest Man’s Fortune.















RECOMMENDED TEXTS

1. ANTHOLOGIES

  Gbemisola, A. (2005). Naked Soles, Ibadan Kraft

  Eruvbetine, A. E. et al (1991). Poetry for Secondary Schools, Lagos: Longman

Hayward, J. (ed.) (1968). The Penguin Book of English Verse, London Penguin

Johnson, R. name(s)? (eds.) (1996). New Poetry from Africa, Ibadan: UP Plc

Kermode, F. name(s)? (1964). Oxford Anthology of English Literature, Vol. II, London: OUP

Senanu, K. E. and Vincent, T. (eds.) (1993). A Selection of African Poetry, Lagos: Longman

Sonyinka, W. (ed.) (1987). Poems of Black Africa, Ibadan: Heinemann

Wendy Cope (1986). Making Cocoa for Kingsley Amis, London: Faber and Faber


2. CRITICAL TEXTS

Abrams, M. H. (1981). A Glossary of Literary Terms, (4th Edition) New York, Holt Rinehalt and Winston

Emeaba, O. E. (1982). A Dictionary of Literature, Aba:  Inteks Press

Murphy, M. J. (1972). Understanding Unseen, An Introduction to English Poetry and English Novel for       Overseas Students, George Allen and Unwin Ltd.

Nwachukwu-Agbada, J. O. J. (2011). Exam Focus:  Literature in English, Ibadan: UP Plc.

Wisdomline Pass at Once JAMB.



No comments

We love to hear from you!